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generation ungrateful

April 20, 2012

Merci, shukran, do jeh, tak, danke, mahalo, gratias, motashakkeram, tapadh leat, gracias, ca’m on, diolch.

There are over 6,500 languages in which to say “thank you.” Within those 6,500 languages there are countless ways to express gratification and to give thanks—so why is it that so many of us cannot pick one language and one form of “thank you?”

Correct me if I am wrong, but I do believe as children, saying please and thank you are two of the first things we learned once we could talk and comprehend life, not only did we learn why and when to say please and thank you, we were scolded if we did not say them.

Parents raise their children to have good manners, always say please and thank you, well at least that’s how it was when I was growing up.

The bush I’m beating around is the ungrateful generation. The problem is, I don’t know which generation is to ‘blame’ anymore. 

When did ‘thank you’ become the two hardest words to say or convey? I get it. The new generation does not partake in human interaction, it’s all about Facebook posts, texts, blogs and maybe an email or two, they don’t dare use a phone to actually speak to someone.  Thank you notes or acknowledgement can still be conveyed via text, email, wall post, message in a bottle, whatever you wish, it doesn’t have to be an actual, old-school hand-written and snail mailed note.

Writing a thank you note may be out of style, but acknowledging a gift or act of kindness should never be.

Here’s the world of thanks the way I’ve come to see it
When you give a gift or do something nice for…

• a very young child
past: parents would write a thank you note as if it was from the child –or- they would write a thank you note thanking you for what you had done and expressed that the child much appreciates it or will someday.
present: you’ll be lucky if you get to talk to the child’s neighbor’s dog’s veterinarian to find out if the child even got the present you sent.

• an adult 
past: a phone call, visit or hand-written letter that would express more than gratitude and thanks, maybe why they love the gift or how they plan to use it etc... bottom line, it showed gratitude. 
present: 2012 text thank-yous are dead, they're too personal and they might have to keep texting with you.  You'll be lucky if you get a Facebook post. Better get a tracking number, that's pretty much the only way you will know if they receive your gift. 

Not everyone is ungrateful. I still write thank you cards and cards for all occasions. My BFF and I still call each other on our birthdays, as well as a text and Facebook post. Looking for some great stationery? Check out my review about Paper Culture

Personal communication and signs of gratitude are endangered, don't let them become extinct. 




5 comments:

  1. If I did not write thank you notes, I still think my mom would find out and be disappointed. So, I still write them. A text is silly.

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  2. I agree that this is an ungrateful generation since I taught middle school for 3 years, but hope my girls don't grow up ungrateful. As I read this I was sitting here writing Megan's Thank you for her birthday gifts and although she can't write them she picked out the cards and will make a drawing in them so she involved. Good points and sadly it's so true.

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  3. I agree that this is an ungrateful generation since I taught middle school for 3 years, but hope my girls don't grow up ungrateful. As I read this I was sitting here writing Megan's Thank you for her birthday gifts and although she can't write them she picked out the cards and will make a drawing in them so she involved. Good points and sadly it's so true.

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  4. LOL so true about the thank you cards or phone calls. I used to absolutely dread calling my family on my birthday's because I would have to talk to them on the phone (which I hated then), but now, I make my daughter do it. It is definitely a different time now. It's unfortunate. I think that I was so scared that my mom would actually find out, that I never did stupid stuff....well not that stupid..but it just seems like parents don't care about teaching their children respect for others.

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